Visual and Emotional representation

So, how can we respond to complex texts and more specifically to stories that move us? Each semester I ask my literacy students to bring a visual representation of a response to one of two short story selections by Sandra Cisneros: “Salvador, Late or Early,” or “Eleven.”  My purpose– to have students engage in the kind of response for which words are not needed. When they bring their visuals and talk about their meanings, I am both amazed AND affirmed that allowing opportunity for creating is important. Here is the work of my fabulous learners!! If you know the two short stories you will have fun inferring. If you do not know the stories, it is not necessary to appreciate the depth of emotion experienced by the students. 
   
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
   

Visual/Emotional Responses x 2

Again, I had my preservice teachers collaborate to create visuals that portrayed emotional connections to “Eleven” by Sandra Cisneros–a short text about a young girl who experiences her eleventh birthday with hurt and pain as she is wrongly accused (by the teacher and a few classmates) of leaving a raggedy red sweater too long in the cloakroom. The short story is powerful–so much so that invariably a few of my students choose to use this short text with various strategic teaching lessons in their field classrooms.

Here are the visuals they created from “Eleven,” and the link below is to my post of last spring–amazing how art can reveal what words cannot.

IMG_1058 IMG_1057 IMG_1056 IMG_1053 IMG_1052 IMG_0866 IMG_0865 IMG_0864

When Visuals are Just Right…

The text, “Eleven,” can be found in the following collection of short stories by Sandra Cisneros..available on Amazon or BN, or your favorite online resource: Unknown

She also has a fabulous website http://www.sandracisneros.com

Enjoy!!

What likes what, when Autumn comes…?

What likes What?  is an observational writing strategy that I have done for years (see my scratch what likes what notes on my writer’s notebook page)…In the novel Cold Mountain, Ruby tells Ada,  in trying to describe how she knows so much about plants, herbs, the natural world: Well, you just have to know what likes what…”...that line spoke to me. So, I have lists, still compiling them and some have become small works of art. This is a good observational suggestion for students–to notice what likes what throughout their day. If you have students do this exercise it will open their eyes to really noticing the world. The world is full of beauty–beauty in the simplest of sights and moments. Here are a few examples of my recent photo shots, to which I have added What likes What jots…Ask your students–What likes What when Autumn comes?

DSCN2792golden dune-lined path likes solitary companion

IMG_4621...shades-of-blue-lake like November day whitecaps

Dec 3 sun e…Autumn leaves like surprise of early snowfall

IMG_1117…yellow maple leaves like shadow and light

IMG_1137..November lake likes lingering kiss of sunset

IMG_1133…weathered dune pine likes view from above

IMG_1124…brown forest floor likes nature’s brilliant contrast

IMG_1709…downy woodpecker likes calm Autumn morning

Around the World in Nine Photos

This is the second set of ‘Round the World Photos I have reblogged. What writing possibilities they offer!! ENJOY!

The WordPress.com Blog

Do you love stories from around the world? Check out the work of the following nine photographers on WordPress.com and allow your imagination to take you away…

Nathanael‘s monochrome photo of the Star Lite Motel in Mt. Airy, North Carolina, conjures images of wayward romances and clandestine meetings. We loved the marquee’s message, “Forgive and forget its human to err.” (sic) which offers an almost haunting absolution. For more of Nathanael’s work, check out his blog, G’Nat’s Eye View.

Photo by Nathanael Photo by P. Nathanael Gough

The image below, by UK photographer Andy Hooker, had us at hello. We love how the sign matches the woman’s red coat and how her right leg is in crisp focus just as her stride reaches the “h” above her head. Check out more of Andy’s work at LensScaper.

Photo by Andy Hooker Photo by Andy Hooker

Bao Pham‘s photo of this

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YES to Arts Integration!

Arts Integration

Great article (located on a cool resource website The Edvocate) on the how’s and why’s for integrating the arts across the K-12 curriculum, a topic of passion for me. I especially love this statement from the article:

Why does art integration work?

The science behind arts integration is solid. Simply put, more of the brain is at work when the arts are part of the learning process, strengthening attentiveness, reaction time and comprehension. There is also plenty of research to suggest that arts education methods improve long-term retention. In other words, what the students learn through arts integration will stay in their memories for longer than that year’s standardized test. When students are allowed academic expression through artistic means, like drawing a picture or writing a song, the information is embedded in their minds. Long-term learning and practical application of knowledge are both supported when the arts are integrated.  (Matthew Lynch, 2014)

 

 

 

Arts Integration: Resource Roundup | Edutopia

 

So many rich resources. Edutopia  just rocks!

Arts Integration: Resource Roundup | Edutopia.